Jisha Menon

Jisha Menon

Ph.D., Stanford University, Drama (2004)
MA., Jawaharlal Nehru University, English (1996)
B.A., Bangalore University, English (1993)

About

Jisha Menon is assistant professor of Theater and Performance Studies at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford and her M.A. from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She is the author of The Performance of Nationalism: India, Pakistan, and the Memory of Partition(Cambridge University Press, 2013) and co-editor, along with Patrick Anderson, of Violence Performed: Local Roots and Global Routes of Conflict (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.) She is currently at work on two concurrent projects: she is completing the manuscript of her second monograph, Pedestrian Acts: Performing the City in Neoliberal India. She is also co-editing, along with Milija Gluhovic, Rethinking the Secular: Performance, Religion and the Public Sphere.

Jisha Menon teaches courses at the intersection of postcolonial theory and performance studies. She received her M.A. in English Literature from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and her Ph.D in Drama from Stanford University. Her research interests lie at the intersection of religion and secularity, gender and nationalism, cosmopolitanism and globalization. She has published essays on the Indian partition, diasporic feminist theatre, political violence in South Asia, transnational queer theory, and neoliberal urbanism. Her book, Performance of Nationalism: India, Pakistan and the Memory of Partition (Cambridge UP, 2013), considers the affective and performative dimensions of nation-making. The book recuperates the idea of "mimesis" to think about political history and the crisis of its aesthetic representation, while also paying attention to the mimetic relationality that undergirds the encounter between India and Pakistan. She is also at work on a second project, Pedestrian Acts: Performing the City in Neoliberal India, which considers new narrations of selfhood that are produced at the intersection of neoliberal state, global market and consumer fantasy. She is co-editor, with Patrick Anderson, of a volume of essays, Violence Performed: Local Roots and Global Routes of Conflict (Palgrave-Macmillan Press, 2009) that explores the coimbrication of violence, performance, and modernity in a variety of geopolitical spaces.

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